Emory Peak, Boot Canyon, and Northeast Rim

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/3.6, 1/850 sec, ISO200
“Sunrise from TM1” Big Bend National Park, 2020

I woke up this morning to a lightening sky, grabbed my BRS-3000T stove, Stanley cooking pot, some water, and instant coffee and found a nice location to enjoy the sunrise. From the Toll Mountain campsite, you have a nice view east through Boot Canyon, and also to the north-west where you can see the Chisos Mountain Lodge down below, and the mountains in the distance. Toll Mountain (TM1) is really a great campsite!

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/3.6, 1/10 sec, ISO400
“Stanley Adventure Cookpot” Big Bend National Park, 2020
Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/11, 1/100 sec, ISO400
“Chisos Mountain Lodge” Big Bend National Park, 2020

After the sun warmed us up a bit, we packed up our campsite, then headed down to the Emory Peak trail-head. There are bear-boxes there so you can stow your gear before heading up the trail to the peak, which is a great thing because lugging a 40-pound pack up there would not be fun!

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/8, 1/100 sec, ISO640
“Emory Peak Awaits” Big Bend National Park, 2020

The hike up Emory Peak Trail was easy and fun since I just had a liter of water, some trail-mix, and my jacket in my lightweight Gonex backpack. I also had my camera and binoculars around my neck, as well as my trekking pole.

We had watched a few YouTube videos about the Emory Peak summit, and they all mentioned the last 25-feet of the trail is a scramble up to the summit. There is a left route and a right route, with the left being easier. However, they don’t mention that they go to separate summits. The right side is the higher of the two, but you need to do a little scrambling up the rocks. Honestly, it was easier than I was expecting, and as long as you take it slow and keep three points of contact at all times, you’ll be fine.

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/11, 1/100 sec, ISO640
“Emory Peak Marker” Big Bend National Park, 2020

The view from the Emory Peak summit was literally awesome. The drop-off was intense and the view was amazing. It was so cool to be able to touch the geologist badge that is embedded in the rock up there — something that was on our bucket list! After spending about 15 minutes on the summit, enjoying some water and snacks, it was time to scramble down. If you can, try to remember the way up because it will help you choose the right way back down.

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/11, 1/100 sec, ISO400
“Distant Santa Elena Canyon” Big Bend National Park, 2020

The hike back to the trail-head was fast, with no water breaks needed. Ah, downhill hiking is great!

We retrieved our backpacks from the bear-boxes at the trail-head and then took Boot Canyon Trail towards Boot Spring. Again, the trail was mostly downhill and we enjoyed the views of the famous “boot” that gives the canyon its name and soon reached the spring without incident. Water was flowing from the pipe at Boot Spring, so we used our water filters to refill our water supply, then hit the trail again and made our way to our next campsite. By the way, the HydroBlu Versa Flow water filter is an awesome little device!

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/11, 1/100 sec, ISO640
“Boot at Boot Canyon” Big Bend National Park, 2020

From Boot Canyon Trail, we changed to East Rim Trail and slogged up until we reached our campsite, NE2/ER2. The site is nestled a short distance from the rim and has plenty of room for two tents, and possible three. Also, it’s sheltered a bit from the wind making it a great “base camp” for exploring the north rim.

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/5.6, 1/100 sec, ISO2000
“ER2/NE2 Campsite” Big Bend National Park, 2020

We set up camp, then went farther up the trail to where it ends. Usually you can hike all the around to the south rim, but from February 1 – May 31, part of the trail is closed due to Peregrine Falcon nesting. However, there are some places along the north rim with some spectacular views. In fact, we decided to pack up our cooking sets and bring them to one of the north rim spots to eat dinner while enjoying the incredible vistas.

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/5.6, 1/100 sec, ISO1000
“Closed Trail” Big Bend National Park, 2020
Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/5.6, 1/100 sec, ISO2000
“Dinner Spot” Big Bend National Park, 2020

Not only could we see the north side of the park, but when we turned around, we could see the incredible sunset over the south rim. It was terrific!

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/4, 1/25 sec, ISO6400
“Sunset” Big Bend National Park, 2020

Tonight’s dinner from the rim was another Mountain House meal: Chicken Teriyaki with Rice and Vegetables. The hot food in the cold back-country was again satisfying, especially after a long hiking day. I’d say the Beef Stroganoff was a little more to my liking, but both are yummy. I capped off the evening with some whiskey and hot water (OMG so good!) before climbing into my tent and crashing.

Here are a few more photos from the day:

Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/5.6, 1/100 sec, ISO1000
“Marmot Catalyst 2P” Big Bend National Park, 2020
Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/5.6, 1/100 sec, ISO2000
“Woodpecker at Boot Spring” Big Bend National Park, 2020
Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/11, 1/100 sec, ISO500
“Boot Canyon” Big Bend National Park, 2020
Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/5.6, 1/100 sec, ISO640
“North Rim Dinner View” Big Bend National Park, 2020
Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/11, 1/100 sec, ISO2500
“North Rim” Big Bend National Park, 2020
Photo info: FUJIFILM X100T, 19mm, f/8, 1/50 sec, ISO200
“Casa Grande from TM1” Big Bend National Park, 2020

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